Books a Million

iBookstore

Kindle (ebook)

Nook (ebook)

Google Play (ebook)


Anna, who is also the publisher of New Academia Publishing, would like to create a website for her book.  In Anna’s words: "I want something simple and elegant which includes: main page (the book), author bio page, book news page, events, previous books page, Q&A page. contact, links to sale points."


Nice to meet you. Your proposal looks good and is right for our budget. 

As Tanya wrote, I would like something  simple and elegant which includes: main page (the book), author bio page, book news page, events, previous books page, Q&A page, contact, links to sale points. I'll relay on your guidance to achieve a good product.

Tanya, thank you for putting us in touch. We will relay on you for some contents, press quotes and events.

I looked at your website and picked a couple of examples, Fiona Davis and Kim Barker. Obviously my book is different from theirs and the website will reflect its specific features and feeling. Another website that I like, not from your portfolio, is Joe McGinnis Jr.'s,  https://joemcginnissjr.com/. This one is really minimalist. Finally, I have a website for my first novel, which is old and therefore outdated in style, but you may want to take a look, www.albumdifamiglia.com


Additional Praise for Amy’s Story

"Amy's Story is simply spellbinding. This is a story at once about identity, love and social upheaval; a woman's journey from old world to new; from Italy to America. Mysterious, brave and captivating."
—Joe McGinniss Jr., author of Carousel Court and The Delivery Man

“From the collapsing towers of 9/11 to the lyrical groves of northern Italy, the author ingeniously morphs Amy’s Story into a journey across America and back and forth across time. Along the way we meet a cohort of colorful characters, witness several romances, and there are wars and politics, tooall woven into a mesmerizing narrative that unspools like a good film. Anna Lawton is not only a scholar of the first rank, but a deft and artful novelist with a flair for the unexpected in her work.”  
Louis Menashe, author of Moscow Believes in Tears: Russians and Their Movies

 “Lawton’s characters connect to words with dynamic interactions and intellectual alacrity.  This author’s voice manages both the interior lives of her characters and the connective tissue of their worlds. Anna Lawton’s mastery of story orchestrates the best out of ‘situation and plot,’ with a full range ofmotion using the entire emotional alphabet.”
Grace Cavalieri, Producer/host, “The Poet and the Poem from the Library of Congress”

“From the collapsing towers of 9/11 to the lyrical groves of northern Italy, the author ingeniously morphs Amy’s Story into a journey across America and back and forth across time. Along the way we meet a cohort of colorful characters, witness several romances, and there are wars and politics, too—all woven into a mesmerizing narrative that unspools like a good film. Anna Lawton is not only a scholar of the first rank, but a deft and artful novelist with a flair for the unexpected in her work.” 
—Louis Menashe, author of Moscow Believes in Tears: Russians and Their Movies


Buy options - is the book available at these retailers as well?

Books a Million

iBookstore

Kindle (ebook)

Nook (ebook)

Google Play (ebook)


Praise for Anna Lawton’s Album di famiglia

“It’s a beautiful story. The language is impeccable, not overly literary (unnatural), and not overly conversational (sloppy) either. It’s the perfect language for this story, a saga with its truth filtered through the fabric of narration. It’s the work of a novelist, not of a memoirist.”
—Camilla Baresani, author of four novels, the latest is Himalayan Pink Salt

 “I liked the book immensely, from beginning to end. I found it enticing, evocative, at times heart rendering, at times even comic… The narrative carries you from page to page relentlessly. And now that I’m finished, I want to start again…”
—Paul Buckmaster, music composer

 “This novel, which has its beginning in family photos, reminds me of the monumental work of Amos Oz, A Story of Love and Darkness. The present novel traces a family saga over three generations, weaving the stories of the many characters with the facts of Italian history. The mythical castle, which provides the visual frame to the novel, serves as the backdrop for the family album which the author used as the literary expedient to begin the narrative.”
—Ugo Cardinale, Professor of Italian Literature at University of Trieste

“I found this novel very enticing and certainly worth of a film adaptation. The narrative style is on the same level as that of the best writers of our time, both for the attention to details and for the description of the characters that are finely sketched in their complex psychological dimensions. This novel is a large narrative fresco with visual impact, historical scope and sustained pace, which makes us think of Bertolucci’s cinematic epic 1900. It can also be regarded as a kind of Piedmontese counterpart to The Leopard.”
—Roberto Severino, Professor of Italian, Emeritus, Georgetown University

 “Album di famiglia presents both traits of a family novel and a historical novel (1870-1940). History, however, is not merely presented by way of the backdrop, rather it emerges from oral narratives and photographic and cinematic images. The author skillfully links the genre of the novel to the new media where images dictate the meaning, and she turns it into a low-key experiment in style. The narrator never fails, however, to present in a reserved manner her own take on all the members of her extraordinary family.”
— Stefania Lucamante, Professor of Italian, Catholic University of America

“I read this novel with great interest. Being the first fiction book by this author, the literary quality is even more striking. I’m not Italian, but I have spent many years in Italy. I’m sure certain scenes from this novel will forever be etched in my mind–scenes that in a few words gave me a picture of fascism more complete that the many volumes written by historians and scholars. Moreover, this book gave me a better knowledge of contemporary Italy than all of the books I have read so far.”
—Magda Zalan, journalist

I see several pages called OTHER BOOKS OR OTHER NOVELS, but no pages for PRESS, EVENTS, Q&A, CONTACTS. YOU NEED TO CREATE THESE PAGES.

KEEP ONLY ONE PAGE FOR OTHER BOOKS, NOT OTHER NOVELS. LIST BOOKS IN THIS ORDER:

1.    ALBUM DI FAMIGLIA (FAMILY ALBUM)

2.    IMAGING RUSSIA 2000

3.    BEFORE THE FALL

4.    KINOGLASNOST

5.    WORDS IN REVOLUTION

6.    THE RED SCREEN

7.    VADIM SHERSHENEVICH

BLURBS:

1.       ALBUM DI FAMIGLIA: Romanzo(the English translation, FAMILY ALBUM: A Novel, is upcoming in the fall 2017)

This enticing family saga unfolds on the background of Italian history from 1870 to 1945. The rich narrative tapestry includes a castle in the Monferrato area, three women, three generations, and a multitude of minor characters. It brings to the fore individual lives and human predicaments, personal feelings and universal themes. The lives of the three main characters, apparently ordinary, but actually tragic in their inexorable degradation, are placed in a coral context that includes: the castle dwellers and the villagers, industrial entrepreneurs and socialist agitators, dive of the silent screen and working girls, American officers in WWI, fascist thugs and victims of the regime, a rogue and an honest prostitute, a star of the Neapolitan varieté, a Russian prince, a descendant of Sir Walton the pirate, a band of partisans, a populist priest, and even a domestic leopard. 

The place that inspired the novel is the Castello di Cortanze, which belonged to the author’s family

 and served as the set for the staging of a video.

www.albumdifamiglia.net

http://www.newacademia.com/academic-books/russian-history-and-culture/imaging-russia-2000-film-and-facts/

“I liked the book immensely, from beginning to end. I found it enticing, evocative, at times heart rendering, at times even comic… The narrative carries you from page to page relentlessly. And now that I’m finished, I want to start again…

—Paul Buckmaster, movie musiccomposer. Hollywood

“It’s a beautiful story. The language is impeccable, not overly literary (unnatural), and not overly conversational (sloppy) either. It’s the perfect language for this story, a saga with its truth filtered through the fabric of narration. It’s the work of a novelist, not of a memoirist.”

—Camilla Baresani, author of four novels, the latest is Himalayan Pink Salt

“Being the first fiction book by this author, the literary quality is even more striking. I’m not Italian, but I have spent many years in Italy. I’m sure certain scenes from this novel will forever be etched in my mind–scenes that in a few words gave me a picture of fascism more complete that the many volumes written by historians and scholars. Moreover, this book gave me a better knowledge of contemporary Italy than all of the books I have read so far.”

—Magda Zalan, journalist. Budapest

“I found this novel very enticing and certainly worth of a film adaptation. The narrative style is on the same level as that of the best writers of our time, both for the attention to details and for the description of the characters that are finely sketched in their complex psychological dimensions. This novelis a large narrative fresco with visual impact, historical scope and sustained pace, which makes us think of Bertolucci’s cinematic epic 1900. It can also be regarded as a kind of Piedmontese counterpart to The Leopard.”

—Roberto Severino, Professor Emeritus,  Georgetown University. Washington DC

“This novel, which has its beginning in family photos, reminds me of the monumental work of Amos Oz, A Story of Love and Darkness. The present novel traces a family saga over three generations, weaving the stories of the many characters with the facts of Italian history. The mythical castle, which provides the visual frame to the novel, serves as the backdrop for the family album which the author used as the literary expedient to begin the narrative.”

—Ugo Cardinale, Professor of Italian Literature at University of Trieste, Italy

2.       IMAGING RUSSIA 2000: Film and Facts.

This book incorporates the realities of the 1990s in Russia, focusing on film production, the films themselves, and the socio-political-cultural context. The result is an unfolding story, in which film and facts occupy the same space. The author roams through the narrative, opening fresh fields of vision, and building unexpected montage sequences. She invites the readers to follow her and engage in a challenging interactive game.

“Lawton’s excellent book is both a path-breaking survey of Russian cinema since the fall of the Soviet Union and a lively firsthand account of the faltering first steps of the newly democratic capitalist state.” 

 - Stuart Liebman, CHOICE Magazine

“This melange of emotional diary entries, rough sketches, exhilarating first-person reportage on two coups d’état, abundant flashbacks spotlighting the country’s history, digests of the cinema press, and more, turns out to be a fine way of uncovering the identity of post-Soviet Russia.”
-Andrei Khrenov, CINEASTE

“Lawton’s latest book is subversive in both content and form... Superbly researched and vividly written... It is a ‘must read’.” 
-Denise J. Youngblood, author of Russian War Films: On the Cinema Front, 1914-2005

“This book is an engaging read and an informative resource.” 
-Seth Graham, The Russian Review

“Lawton’s book is a first-person journalistic report by a Moscow-based writer living through the decade’s many traumas. Her analyses of the movies are shaded by her personal experience of the post-Soviet situation— the failed coup of August 1991 and the parliamentary crisis of autumn 1993, as well as anecdotes about shopping and apartment hunting—yet they never strike a false note.”

—Vance Kepley Jr., Slavic Review

 

http://www.newacademia.com/academic-books/russian-history-and-culture/imaging-russia-2000-film-and-facts/

3.BEFORE THE FALL: Soviet Cinema in the Gorbachev Years

This is an expanded edition of Kinoglasnost: Soviet Cinema in Our Time (Cambridge University Press, 1992.) The book examines the fascinating world of Soviet cinema during the years of glasnost and perestroika—the 1980s. It shows how the reforms that shook the foundations of the Bolshevik state and affected economic and social structures have been reflected in the film industry.

A new added chapter provides a commentary on the dramatic changes that marked the beginning of democracy in Russia.

 “What makes Kinoglasnost pre-eminent among current studies of the subject is that sustained attention Lawton pays to changes in the formal organization of Soviet cinema and in the cinema industry.”
- Julian Graffy, Sight and Sound

“Lawton’s book now stands as a valuable work of history on one aspect of a collapsed system... This remains as a testimony of a fateful moment that has changed the course of history.”
- Louis Menashe, The Russian Review

“The author constructs a complex, multilayered narrative of a steady and significant movement toward radical change in Soviet society, an account of the growing anxiety and the hope experienced by Russian filmmakers and the intelligentsia.”
- Ludmila Z. Pruner, Slavic and East European Journal

COVER OF KINOGLASNOST

http://www.newacademia.com/academic-books/russian-history-and-culture/before-the-fall-soviet-cinema-in-the-gorbachev-years-2/

4.WORDS IN REVOLUTION: Russian Futurist Manifestoes, 1912-1928.

This is the second edition of Russian Futurism Through Its Manifestoes 1912-1928 (Cornell University Press, 1988). This collection made available for the first time in English the writings of the Russian Futurists, which supplied the theoretical base of their movement. An extensive Introduction by Anna Lawton provides an overview of the movement, and places it in the context of the global international avant garde.

"This book is a major U.S. contribution toward a better understanding of the avant-garde. It is a useful book not only for scholars of Russian but for those in comparative literature and the history of art and culture as well."
- Magdalena Medaric, Literary Reaserch/Recherche Littéraire 

"Lawton and Eagle skillfully meet the challenge, and their translations well preserve the spirit and general intent found in the original texts. The efforts by Lawton and Eagle provide highly useful documents for English-speakers on the nature of Russian ligerary modernism."
- Juliette R. Stepanian, Slavic and East European Journal

"The volume produced by Lawton and Eagle is valuable and timely...The editors have shown themselves eminently qualified to pass judgement on the Russian avant-garde."
-Victor Terras, The Russian Review

http://www.newacademia.com/academic-books/russian-history-and-culture/words-in-revolution-russian-futurist-manifestoes-1912-1928/

5.THE RED SCREEN: Politics, Society, Art in Soviet Cinema.

This original collection of essays was generated from papers presented at a conference on Soviet Cinema in the US, which gathered together leading Soviet cinema scholars and international specialists for the first time. The conference took place at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, and was organized by Dr. Anna Lawton, who also edited this volume and wrote an extensive introduction. This collection encompasses seventy years of cinema history from the perspective of twenty academics of different backgrounds and nationalities.

[NO LINK FOR THIS BOOK]

6.VADIM SHERSHENEVICH: From Futurism to Imaginism.

Shershenevich was one of the most interesting poets and theoreticians of Russian modernism. In his Futurist stage he was notable for his use of Marinetti’s ideas in Russia (he translated Marinetti’s manifestoes, and was the only Russian poet to acknowledge the debt to Marinetti). More importantly, he was founder and leader of Imaginism in Russia, beginning with the first manifesto in 1919 (also signed by Esenin and Marienhof). Anna Lawton’s study contains a general survey of his life and work, plus detailed chapters on Futurism without a Mask, Green Street, and 2 + 2 = 5, the fundamental Imaginist book. The study contains bibliographies of works by and about Shershenevich.

Testimonies from Russian scholars reveal that in Soviet times, when works on the avant garde where removed from circulation, one copy of this book was held in the Lenin Library in Moscow, and made accessible only to select researchers by special permission. Later the author received several thank you notes from those researchers.